MEET SAMANTHA SHARPE AND HER LATEST TUNE ‘HOME’

Today we are bringing you the young charming singer and songwriter Samantha Sharpe who has just released a heartfelt acoustic love song named ‘Home’. A brilliant follow-up to her debut EP ‘Gilded Cage’ that was released in 2019. Based in Melbourne, Australia, Sharpe creates her gorgeous well written folk-pop that is blended with a reminiscent ‘end of 2000’s Taylor Swift’ sound, which ultimately fuses into something rather unique. Having played support slots with ‘The Chatoozies’ and performed the National Anthem at Melbourne Ballpark three times for the National Baseball League games Sharpe has already achieved a lot, so we were happy to learn more about the talents coming plans.   


YMX: Hey Samantha Sharpe, thanks for talking to us. How have these gloomy times been treating you? 

SAMANTHA SHARPE: It’s been a strange time, but I’m healthy and safe so I’m very lucky. Got to look on the bright side, especially when things feel a tad dark.

YMX: How did you decide music was something you wanted to pursue? Are there any particular episodes that inspired you in doing so?

SAMANTHA SHARPE: I wanted to be a rockstar when I was a little kid, and was fascinated by the popstars who dominated the 90s. I can still remember performing Britney Spears songs for my parents on a makeshift stage in my backyard, and learning the dance moves to the Spice Girls hits with my older sister, just for the hell of it. It’s always been a part of me, I suppose. As I got older, I convinced myself it wasn’t something I could do, or a real job, I guess. That maybe it was something that only happened in movies. I didn’t know anybody in my life who had pursued music, in any form, really, so it was something that seemed out of reach. Thus.. I chose different paths. A lot of them! I have been many different things in my life already, I tried the fitness industry, retail, hospitality, I was a children’s entertainer.. but nothing was the right thing for me. Every other thing I’ve tried to do got boring very quickly. Music, I have now done for the longest, I think. It’s still part of who I am. I guess that won’t change!

YMX: Here’s a fun game: name 3 artists, or bands, that inspire you and influence your work, and explain why:

SAMANTHA SHARPE: I’ve always been inspired by P!nk, for having strong vocals and a give ’em hell attitude, and for having fun with her craft. I admire Lady Gaga immensely, not just for her unique approach to everything she tackles, but for her strong vocals and her overall strength of character. Thirdly, I think I take a lot of inspiration from musicians from bygone eras, like Roy Orbison and the like. The true musicianship is what makes that era of music so inspiring. Harmonies, instrumentation, and just pure talent. I’m inspired to be an artist with “musicianship”, who can play live, and can play without any special effects, and still make beautiful music.

YMX: You recently released single ‘Home’. Can you tell us how that project came about? 

SAMANTHA SHARPE: During lockdown here in Melbourne, there had been a lot of forced distance, and the themes of “Home” were sort of floating around at all times. Missing people became a normal part of daily life, but I started to realise how grateful I was to miss them. I was pretty adamant that I didn’t want to make a sad song about the lockdown, or the pandemic, because the world was already feeling like a gloomy place. I was much more attuned to the idea of making a positive song, and I’m glad I did.

YMX: How did the pandemic affect your personal music recording experience? Was it easy adjusting to working remotely?

SAMANTHA SHARPE: I wrote this song almost entirely at home, unsurprisingly, however it was a while before I could book into my usual studio and get to work on the rest of the track. I tend to work best on my own when I’m writing music and lyrics, but production isn’t my forte, so I like to work with a professional in that regard. When our second lockdown ended, I was able to book time at Salt Studios and make a socially distanced recording with Ross Caygill at the controls.

YMX: Professional livestreams seem to be really taking over these days. Is it something you would consider doing? 

SAMANTHA SHARPE: I’ve done a few livestreams for online festivals and interviews, but it isn’t quite the same as the live shows I had gotten so used to! In future I would likely do it again, but if given the chance I would always prefer to be in the room, live, making some noise!

YMX: Since pandemic the began, online music promotion has become crucial for an artist’s growth. How important is that for you, and are there any strategies you are willing to share with our readers?

SAMANTHA SHARPE: Online music promotion has been absolutely crucial, absolutely, and it’s something that’s more important than ever, not just due to the pandemic, I think, but due to the way we all process and experience content and art in this day and age. With streaming services for music, movies, tv, web series, etc, there’s so much to do online that it can be tricky to break through all of that noise, but that’s definitely where the people are. It’s undeniable! I wish I had a strategy! My only advice is to try different things, and to keep learning. There are so many platforms, so many algorithms, there’s a lot to keep up with, but if you can teach yourself how to use one or two, you’re doing better than most. Just keep learning and utilising what you’ve found out.

YMX: Finally, what are your plans for the future? 

SAMANTHA SHARPE: I am working on releasing an album sometime in the future, but I haven’t put a timeline on it; this past year has taught me that nothing is set in stone, and sometimes you’ve got to adapt; hopefully it will be sooner, rather than later, but we will have to see!